• Steve Ballmer Provides Insight into his Legacy in an Exit Interview



    Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer’s days at Microsoft continue to dwindle down as he participated in a new interview reflecting on his legacy, in which he boasts how profitable he made the company’s business and takes credit for the company’s buzz-generating but not particularly profitable Xbox division.

    Ballmer sat down for an interview with journalist Mary Jo Foley, who spoke with Microsoft’s departing chief executive with Fortune. In the discussion, Ballmer was proud of the fact that he managed to double Microsoft’s profits and triple its revenues under his watch, a triumph he compared to Apple’s recent success. He said the following regarding the matter:

    In the last five years, probably Apple has made more money than we have. But in the last 13 years, I bet we've made more money than almost anybody on the planet. And that, frankly, is a great source of pride to me.
    The CEO also took credit for Microsoft’s major push into the living room over the last 12 years with its Xbox franchise. This year marks the company’s largest endeavor with the launch of the new Xbox One gaming console, which Microsoft announced on Wednesday has sold 2 million units since it debuted last month. Although the Xbox has earned buzz in the console gaming market and sold tens of millions of units, it’s mostly been losing operation for Microsoft. In particular, high failure rates with the Xbox 360 console cost the company over a billion dollars. Ballmer said the following regarding the matter:

    I believe in accountability. I'm in. I'm accountable. I'll make this work — not that I had to drive it — but we had some bumps in the road. And it was important that I stay accountable, stay patient, and stay behind the decision that we made.
    He continued by insisting that he’s leaving Microsoft better than he found it with the company being “more focused” after his tenure. He attributed that to Microsoft falling from being a “complete leader” to a “leader and a challenger.” Challengers, he said, have to be more focused to stay alive.

    Ballmer talks about his plans to retire from Microsoft in August, bringing an aend to his 13-year reign over the software giant. The search for his successor remains ongoing as of right now.

    It should be noted that in recent years, Microsoft has seen poor performances of flagship products such as Windows 8. The disappointments led to a pay cut for Ballmer in his final months at the company as well. Critics say that Microsoft has seemingly failed to adapt to the modern mobile age, while Apple has found considerable success with its iPhone and iPad lineups.

    Source: Fortune via AppleInsider
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Steve Ballmer Provides Insight into his Legacy in an Exit Interview started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 3 Comments
    1. fanboyfanboy's Avatar
      fanboyfanboy -
      Here's the problem with apple, Microsoft, Google, Samsung, etc. everyone designing is older. I know this will never happen, but they grew up developing this technology, and the innovation was amazing. But to keep the innovation going they need to bring in fresh YOUNG workers (25-35) Ones who truly understand what the next generation (15-25) want. The older generation doesn't fully comprehend what the new generation wants. To stay ahead of the game you need people who understand what the next generation is looking for in terms of features, hardware, software. Etc.
    1. Jato_BZ's Avatar
      Jato_BZ -
      Quote Originally Posted by fanboyfanboy View Post
      Here's the problem with apple, Microsoft, Google, Samsung, etc. everyone designing is older. I know this will never happen, but they grew up developing this technology, and the innovation was amazing. But to keep the innovation going they need to bring in fresh YOUNG workers (25-35) Ones who truly understand what the next generation (15-25) want. The older generation doesn't fully comprehend what the new generation wants. To stay ahead of the game you need people who understand what the next generation is looking for in terms of features, hardware, software. Etc.
      +1 fully agree
    1. tridley68's Avatar
      tridley68 -
      You may have a point but do you think they will listen.
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