• How to Go About Preserving Battery Life on Your New Apple Watch - 11 Tips



    Preserving the battery life on the Apple Watch can be difficult, especially when you have the mindset that you just got a shiny new gadget and can't keep your hands off of it because it's so cool. But there are some steps that you can take to reduce power consumption by a great deal.

    After getting my Apple Watch Sport, I noticed that the battery seemed to drain very quickly -- much faster than I anticipated. While reports were suggesting that the Apple Watch would actually decrease the battery life on my iPhone, I noticed quite the opposite in that my iPhone's battery life seems mostly un-impacted, while the Apple Watch, on the other hand, likes to die relatively quickly. As a result, I went off on a research tangent to try and find out what I could do to keep it alive longer, and in this post, we're going to share with you some tips and tricks we found for keeping your Apple Watch alive as long as possible.

    1. It's An OLED Display... Take Advantage of it!



    The Apple Watch comes with a new OLED display. This is the first time Apple has implemented a display like this in any of its devices. OLED displays are much more power-conserving than LCD displays, like those found in the iPhone, but the battery life from them can be very dependent on what is shown. For this reason, you should do your best to control what appears on your display.

    OLED displays use the most power when various colors have to be shown on the display. They are most power-conserving when you use black or dark colors. While many applications for the device are made with this in mind, some applications have a wide variety of colors in then, such as images that appear in your Instagram or Twitter feed, and will dramatically impact battery life. You should also use a watch face that is as close to black as possible, such as the one we have pictured above.

    By limiting the amount of extreme colors and bright light that the little OLED display has to show, you can preserve a ton of battery life. Just try it!



    2. Limit the Applications You Have Installed on Your Apple Watch



    From the Apple Watch application on your iPhone, you can control what applications are installed on your Apple Watch. Since each application has to talk with the application on your iPhone in order to synchronize its data across both of your devices, this means that the more applications you have installed, the more communicating your Apple Watch will have to do, which, of course, drains your battery quicker.

    It is recommended that you only install applications on your Apple Watch that you're sure you're going to use. It's best not to clutter it with all of your applications on your iPhone just because you want to. Instead, limit the amount of communicating your Apple Watch has to do with your iPhone and you will notice a significant increase in battery performance over an Apple Watch that has to sync information with tons of applications.



    3. Limit the Glances on Your Apple Watch



    Likewise with our previous tip, you should also limit your Glances to the ones that you absolutely know you'll use. Glances are the little widget-style applications you see when you swipe up from your watch face. Each of these Glances have to synchronize with the application on your iPhone, and this also means reduced battery life.

    Although you might use the actual application on your Apple Watch, you might not need the Glance enabled. You can easily disable glances from your Apple Watch application on your iPhone, and also re-order them. Limiting your glances will reduce the amount of communication your Apple Watch needs to do and will in turn, save your battery life.



    4. Do You Even Exercise?



    If you aren't the exercise type, and you only have the Apple Watch for the ability to have notifications on your wrist and other reasons, then you can completely disable some of the fitness features so that your Apple Watch doesn't have to waste its time and resources recording fitness information with its heart rate sensor and fitness tracking applications.

    By disabling these fitness features, your Apple Watch won't use its sensors nearly as much and this means fewer electrical signals needed throughout the day, which will save your battery's charge.

    Of course, if you actually do use these features, then you don't want to follow this step and disable them, but it's always an option for those that don't do any fitness tracking or care about it nonetheless.



    5. Limit Your Display Brightness



    Going along with tip #1, we also have to recommend you keep your display brightness as low as possible so that you don't go burning through your battery life just because you have the brightest wristwatch in the room. If you don't need the brightness that high, turn it down so that your battery can take a break.

    It's mostly self-explanatory that this would save your battery life, but not only will this save battery life, it also puts less wear and tear on the back light behind the display, which will help it last longer throughout the Apple Watch's life.

    You can control your Apple Watch's display brightness both from the Apple Watch itself, or from the Apple Watch application on your iPhone.



    6. Disable the Bell and Whistle Features You Don't Really Need



    The Apple Watch comes with a great feature set, but many of the features are unnecessary to enjoy the Apple Watch experience. Some of these features include Handoff, wrist detection, and activate on wrist raise.

    Now Handoff is nice, but there really isn't a need for it. All it does it pick up on one device where you left off on another. I've personally never used this feature on any of my devices and I prefer it that way, and many of you likely feel the same, but if this is a feature you know you can live without, we would suggest disabling it to prevent additional data syncing between devices, which in turn, saves power.

    Wrist detection and activate on wrist raise are other bell and whistle features that can sometimes lead to more problems than benefits. For example, throughout the day when doing normal tasks, the Apple Watch sometimes things that basic movements of your arm are considered you raising your wrist to look at your Apple Watch, such as reaching over the steering wheel to initiate a turn. These false positives mean the display has to turn on and off, and then on and off, and on and off some more -- this constant state of turning on and off reduces battery expectancy, as does powering this sensor. If you can live without these, then turn them off and just use your other hand to wake up your Apple Watch instead.



    7. Control the Load on the GPU



    The Apple Watch comes with very fluid animations and beautiful software presentation, but if you can do without them and live in a simply utilitarian environment, then try disabling some of the animations to reduce strain on the GPU and preserve your battery life.

    Some examples of this are reducing transparency and reducing motion. If you enable these, your GPU will have less work to do, which means fewer electrical signals and a longer battery life expectancy.

    The only downside to this is that your animations and Apple Watch experience won't be as pleasant without the eye-candy.



    8. Limit Push Notifications



    Just like on your iPhone, push notifications will reduce battery life because they require constant checking to see if there is anything new to alert you about. The Apple Watch can be set up to mirror push notifications from your iPhone. You can even configure from the Apple Watch application on your iPhone what applications will be allowed to send notifications to your Apple Watch.

    If you only need push notifications from certain applications, and not all of them, then consider turning off push notifications for the applications you don't need push notifications from. By doing this, not only does your Apple Watch has fewer things to check for, but it also limits the amount of times that the haptic engine has to tap on your wrist, which will reduce power consumption.

    Limit your push notifications to necessity applications, like iMessage, phone calls, and the likes.



    9. Go Light on Taptic Engine Use



    You can have either very light or very hard taps on your wrist when you receive a notification on your Apple Watch. We recommend not setting this setting too high, and finding a happy median.

    If you don't expect you need the haptic engine at all, you can set this to its lowest setting and you'll see the most battery performance gains. If you can feed the medium tap just fine, you could set it to the medium setting so that the haptic engine doesn't have to do so much work to notify you. Putting the haptic engine on full blast requires the highest amount of effort, and hence uses the most energy from your battery.

    Choosing a good setting for your haptic engine will save your Apple Watch's life throughout the day.



    10. Power Reserve Mode or Power Off



    Our last tip for this post is to take advantage of the Apple Watch's Power Reserve Mode or to power if off when not in use. Apple Watch is pre-programmed to enter Power Reserve Mode on its own whenever the battery gets too low, but you can force Power Reserve Mode either from the Glances menu under the battery information, or by bringing up the power menu by holding down the side button on the watch.

    Power Reserve Mode turns off all unnecessary functions, but still displays the time on the display. This is a good last resort when you're getting low on power.

    Turning your Apple Watch off, on the other hand, guarantees you're not using any power and is a good idea if you know you won't be using your Apple Watch for a little while, such as when you're in the middle of a test in school.



    11. Disable "Hey Siri"



    Among one of the most useful battery preservers I've found since owning the Apple Watch is disabling the built-in "Hey Siri" functionality. With this disabled, your Apple Watch doesn't have to constantly listen for your voice and try to compare it to the words "Hey Siri." In turn, you have more power for other things. You can easily toggle this feature off from the Settings application on your Apple Watch. You can still use Siri on your Apple Watch by pressing and holding on the digital crown button.



    Hopefully you've taken in a few good pointers from these tips and will have a good-lasting Apple Watch throughout your work day. If you have any additional tips, feel free to share in the comments below so that your fellow readers can reap the benefits of your findings!

    Also check out our recent post on how to use some of the handy features of Apple Watch at this link.
    This article was originally published in forum thread: How to Go About Preserving Battery Life on Your New Apple Watch - 10 Tips started by Anthony Bouchard View original post
    Comments 34 Comments
    1. Jozelito617's Avatar
      Jozelito617 -
      Yea... Hmm don't buy one . [emoji23][emoji108]wait for 2 generation
    1. h2a's Avatar
      h2a -
      How to go about preserving battery life on your new Apple Watch:

      1. All those features it has--- forget about em. Turn off everything it does and don't actually use it.
    1. clive.weller's Avatar
      clive.weller -
      This and any future generation of Apple Watch using current battery technology will be an utter waste of money and completely useless.

      Turn off the colours, switch this off, switch that off, don’t load this, don’t load that! - Not much point in having the thing if it can not be used to its full potential without running down the battery in a few hours.

      GOOD GRIEF ANYONE BUYING THIS WATCH MUST BE STARK RAVING BONKERS
    1. buggsy2's Avatar
      buggsy2 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Bouchard View Post

      OLED displays are much more power-conserving than LCD displays, like those in the iPhone, but _they are very volatile_.
      Can you explain this more?
    1. csglinux's Avatar
      csglinux -
      Anthony - you got the 38 mm version, right? With all your tips & tricks, how long are you making that battery last now?
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
      Anthony - you got the 38 mm version, right? With all your tips & tricks, how long are you making that battery last now?
      I am not using ALL of these tips and tricks. I think that would limit my Apple Watch usage to a scenario that I wouldn't enjoy using it. Instead, I'm just using maybe 4-5 of these tips at one time, like limiting notifications and apps and keeping haptic/brightness at reasonable levels.

      But since I only just got the watch yesterday, I can't say for sure any realistic numbers.
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      One thing I missed that helps a lot is disabling "Hey Siri" from the settings of the Apple Watch. This makes it so your Apple Watch doesn't have to listen 100% of the time for your voice.

      Apple disables this feature on the iPhone for the same reason. It only works when plugged in to a power source, unless the user specifies otherwise.
    1. csglinux's Avatar
      csglinux -
      Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Bouchard View Post
      One thing I missed that helps a lot is disabling "Hey Siri" from the settings of the Apple Watch. This makes it so your Apple Watch doesn't have to listen 100% of the time for your voice.

      Apple disables this feature on the iPhone for the same reason. It only works when plugged in to a power source, unless the user specifies otherwise.
      Isn't it only listening when you raise your wrist?

      Even with the iffy battery life, I think I'd be tempted to buy one if only there were a jailbreak that supported 8.2 or higher :-(
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
      Isn't it only listening when you raise your wrist?

      Even with the iffy battery life, I think I'd be tempted to buy one if only there were a jailbreak that supported 8.2 or higher :-(
      I really just wish they packed a denser battery inside. It has some pretty pitiful mAh according to iFixit's teardown.
    1. csglinux's Avatar
      csglinux -
      Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Bouchard View Post
      I really just wish they packed a denser battery inside. It has some pretty pitiful mAh according to iFixit's teardown.
      iFixit pointed out one very clever feature that Apple built into Apple watch version 1.0 - planned obsolescence.
      You know you want version 2 already, don't you? ;-)
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      Quote Originally Posted by csglinux View Post
      iFixit pointed out one very clever feature that Apple built into Apple watch version 1.0 - planned obsolescence.
      You know you want version 2 already, don't you? ;-)
      Absolutely. There is some awesome new battery technology in testing right now that could replace Lithium Ion.
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      So far, disabling Hey Siri has been the overall best battery saver I've done yet.
    1. charliebordelon84's Avatar
      charliebordelon84 -
      I haven't turned anything off and have played with my watch all day everyday since I got it on Friday and have never had the battery go under 20%. So my opinion is the battery has plenty of power.
    1. charliebordelon84's Avatar
      charliebordelon84 -
      By the way it's 10:00 and I've been up since 6 this morning and my battery is on 35%. If you want an apple watch but are getting discouraged from hearing about a bad battery, stop listening. People will always cry about something.
    1. Anthony Bouchard's Avatar
      Anthony Bouchard -
      I wonder why yours is so different. Mine drained 30% in two hours. Mind you, the only thing I did was send 3 messages from it and check the time every 15 minutes.

      Still, just because you have different results as someone else doesn't really give you the grounds to say everyone else is full if it. If anything, the way we use our devices is probably very different.
    1. rolandgabor's Avatar
      rolandgabor -
      Quote Originally Posted by Jozelito617 View Post
      Yea... Hmm don't buy one . [emoji23][emoji108]wait for 2 generation
      Just wanted to post the same [emoji106]🏻[emoji106]🏻[emoji106]🏻
    1. DQEight's Avatar
      DQEight -
      Quote Originally Posted by buggsy2 View Post
      Can you explain this more?
      I personally have never heard them called volatile. But they are more prone to burn in because of the nature of how the displays work.
    1. rolandgabor's Avatar
      rolandgabor -
      Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Bouchard View Post
      I wonder why yours is so different. Mine drained 30% in two hours. Mind you, the only thing I did was send 3 messages from it and check the time every 15 minutes.

      Still, just because you have different results as someone else doesn't really give you the grounds to say everyone else is full if it. If anything, the way we use our devices is probably very different.
      This the reason why I always disagreed with Apples claims of battery life. Apple is the one full of it. It's not something you can uniformly claim. We all use our devices differently. I start using my iPhone 6 at around 8am. Emails, calls, text, Dropbox. By lunch is at 28-35% daily. For others it's different based on what they are using it for. Calling someone names based on being different is just wrong and ignorant.
    1. charliebordelon84's Avatar
      charliebordelon84 -
      I never meant to say anyone was full of it. And didn't meant that you were either for writing this article. If I was having any battery issues I would have found all of this very useful. But something is weird about how long mine lasts compared to yours because I've made a bunch of calls and sent texts today. And played games, shown it off a little, and checked the Braves score a few times. I read somewhere that if you have battery issues you should reset your phone or the watch or something and it should fix it. I would look into that maybe.
    1. charliebordelon84's Avatar
      charliebordelon84 -
      I didn't call anyone a name did I? I feel like what I said was misinterpreted or something. I didn't mean to offend anyone. I was just defending my watch. Sorry if it was taken the wrong way.
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