• Apple Looks to Improve Privacy by Preventing iOS Apps from Seeing Other Installed Apps



    As part of its continued focus on protecting user privacy, Apple is looking to change a policy on third-party applications, preventing them from finding out what other apps are installed on an iPhone or iPad. According to Amir Efrati of The Information, developers won’t be able to access app download data for advertising purposes once the changes are in place. As of right now, apps like Facebook and Twitter access the data and utilize it to better target ads for its users.

    It should be noted that this change is set to take place with iOS 9, which is scheduled to launch for free this fall. The change was previously documented by the company during an app privacy session that was held at the Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month.

    The move is one that aligns with Apple’s previous statements. The Cupertino California company has made an effort to convey to consumers that their privacy is of the most importance to the company. This differs from companies like Google and Facebook, which continue to collect user data in order to sell advertisements. In a previously published letter, Apple CEO, Tim Cook, made it clear that his company is in the business of selling products, not harvesting consumer data. He said the following regarding the matter:

    Security and privacy are fundamental to the design of all our hardware, software, and services, including iCloud and new services like Apple Pay.
    So far, Apple has been sticking to their word. Just last week, the Electronic Frontier Foundation awarded Apple a perfect score in its annual “Who has your back?” report, which rates tech companies on their efforts to secure consumer data against government snooping. In this particular report, Apple earned a five-star rating that ended up beating out companies like Facebook, which received four stars and others like Amazon and Google, both of which received three stars.

    Source: The Information, EFF
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Apple Looks to Improve Privacy by Preventing iOS Apps from Seeing Other Installed Apps started by Akshay Masand View original post
    Comments 4 Comments
    1. TDH Advocate's Avatar
      TDH Advocate -
      This is one of many reasons that I love apple so much. They actually care about the privacy of their users. Unlike anyone else anymore.
    1. Eonhpi's Avatar
      Eonhpi -
      Quote Originally Posted by TDH Advocate View Post
      This is one of many reasons that I love apple so much. They actually care about the privacy of their users. Unlike anyone else anymore.
      +1
    1. hogcia's Avatar
      hogcia -
      Is Apple helping the consumer or simply looking down the iPhone even more? Don't believe everything you read.
    1. talkin73's Avatar
      talkin73 -
      Quote Originally Posted by hogcia View Post
      Is Apple helping the consumer or simply looking down the iPhone even more? Don't believe everything you read.
      This raises some interesting points but also a simple reminder of the overarching concept that personal freedoms and security are, for the most part, inversely related. Apple is also adding measures to iOS 9 that may be intended to make jail breaking more difficult. That would be frustrating to some because it limits what they can do with the phone. But it also improves security because jailbreaks are injected, almost universally, through a security flaw. It depends on what you value most. I have a feeling in about 10-15 years many people are going to look backing with profound regret at information they intentionally or inadvertently allowed into cyberspace. Perhaps even content that seems benign at the time like family photos. The ways in which people are seeking to profit from user data continues to grow and history has convincingly shown that money will motivate and sustain behavior even when it harms others. Personally, my overall preference is for Apple's general approach.
  • Connect With Us

  • Twitter Box

  • Facebook