• Side-By-Side Video Comparison Shows How Much Faster iPhone 6s Plus is At Launching Apps Than iPhone 6 Plus



    The iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus started deliveries on Friday around the world in participating countries, and as people get their units, interesting videos have started to surface. Among some of the more interesting types of content we've seen have been a bend test video, as well as iFixit's detailed teardown of the device.

    A new video, posted by YouTube user Mad Matt TV, shows a side-by-side speed test demonstration of the iPhone 6 Plus and the iPhone 6s Plus. The speed test demonstration includes many of the details you'd expect, such as proof of software type and device type, a boot-up test, application-launching tests, and more.

    The videographer is sure to show us the "S" on the back of the iPhone 6s Plus, being that the new device now has the regulatory information stored in the iOS software rather than on the back of the device like the iPhone 6 Plus does. He then shows that both devices are running the latest firmware for the devices available, which is iOS 9.0.1, which was released first on Wednesday for non-iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus devices, and then a new iOS 9.0.1 with a different build number was launched yesterday for the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus specifically.



    The testing shows that the iPhone 6 Plus and iPhone 6s Plus take about the same amount of time boot up from a complete shut-down, but in terms of application launching speed, the iPhone 6s Plus' upgraded A9 CPU and 2GB of RAM are able to process and load applications much faster than the older iPhone 6 Plus with its A8 CPU and 1GB of RAM.

    The CPU has more to do with the application-launching speed than the RAM does, but when the CPU is done loading all that data, the RAM is where it gets stored temporarily until the user needs to access it again. The iPhone 6s Plus has an advantage because it has more space for this temporary data than the iPhone 6 Plus does, and this means it can more quickly launch multiple applications subsequently without having to re-load applications because the memory just doesn't fill up like the older iPhone 6 Plus' does. But in the way Mad Matt tests his in this video, this information is mostly irrelevant since he closes out of each application after launching it.

    Included in the testing was a Geekbench speed test, which showed that the iPhone 6 Plus' 1.40GHz A8 CPU scored a 1616 single core score and a 2901 multi-core score, which compares to the iPhone 6s Plus' 1.85Ghz A9 CPU, which scored a 2531 single core score and a 4417 multi-core score. What we see here is that the CPU speed increases are actually pretty extensive.

    In a Speedtest.net network speed test, both devices scored about the same speed, but really it's an irrelevant test because the results of this test depend on the user's ISP more-so than the device itself.

    What do you think about the performance of the iPhone 6s/6s Plus? Share below!

    Source: Mad Matt TV
    This article was originally published in forum thread: Side-By-Side Video Comparison Shows How Much Faster iPhone 6s Plus is At Launching Apps started by Anthony Bouchard View original post
    Comments 12 Comments
    1. signori's Avatar
      signori -
      I thought the iPhone 6s Plus would be much faster then the 6 plus. Not much of an advantage speed wise. Still going to buy the iPhone 6s Plus in a couple of months. Hopefully jailbreak will be released by then.
    1. bjppugs's Avatar
      bjppugs -
      Lol that's funny. I'm trying to watch it on my iPhone 6 and it keeps stopping to buffer. AT&T LTE full bars my ***.
    1. Nuff Said's Avatar
      Nuff Said -
      Makes sense, each new iOS renders the current hardware obsolete. It's why with each release we can marvel about how fast the phone is now when we said the same exact thing a year prior on the older device.
    1. vinaygoel2000's Avatar
      vinaygoel2000 -
      I'd like to see a test with 6 plus on 8.4
    1. Brandon.amos's Avatar
      Brandon.amos -
      According to the Geekbench test the lady in California did on Monday, her iPhone 6s processor is clocked at 1.79 Ghz, but my iPhone 6s Plus shows 1.85 Ghz. Can anyone else with a 6s confirm the processor speed of the 6s is slightly slower than 6s Plus? Was it like that for the 6 & 6 Plus?
    1. Kotin6006's Avatar
      Kotin6006 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Nuff Said View Post
      Makes sense, each new iOS renders the current hardware obsolete. It's why with each release we can marvel about how fast the phone is now when we said the same exact thing a year prior on the older device.
      Or the new hardware is the reason.
    1. Kotin6006's Avatar
      Kotin6006 -
      Quote Originally Posted by Brandon.amos View Post
      According to the Geekbench test the lady in California did on Monday, her iPhone 6s processor is clocked at 1.79 Ghz, but my iPhone 6s Plus shows 1.85 Ghz. Can anyone else with a 6s confirm the processor speed of the 6s is slightly slower than 6s Plus? Was it like that for the 6 & 6 Plus?
      Yes it was. I would assume they are clocked different due to heat dispersment with the bigger housing.
    1. Brandon.amos's Avatar
      Brandon.amos -
      Quote Originally Posted by Kotin6006 View Post
      Yes it was. I would assume they are clocked different due to heat dispersment with the bigger housing.
      So does that theoretically mean the 6s Plus is slightly faster? Was that the case last year?
    1. Simon's Avatar
      Simon -
      Quote Originally Posted by Brandon.amos View Post
      According to the Geekbench test the lady in California did on Monday, her iPhone 6s processor is clocked at 1.79 Ghz, but my iPhone 6s Plus shows 1.85 Ghz. Can anyone else with a 6s confirm the processor speed of the 6s is slightly slower than 6s Plus? Was it like that for the 6 & 6 Plus?
      Not sure what was up the other day with that lady's phone. I've seen screenshots from different people today showing geekbench on a 6s and 6s+ and they are both reading at 1.85Ghz.
    1. Nuff Said's Avatar
      Nuff Said -
      Quote Originally Posted by Kotin6006 View Post
      Or the new hardware is the reason.
      How fast can a phone be until speed increases are no longer noticeable? Is the phone considered slow now because in a year it definitely will be slow and outdated once new phones come out.
    1. rolandgabor's Avatar
      rolandgabor -
      Stop calling it the "old iPhone 6".
    1. CZroe's Avatar
      CZroe -
      A new video, posted by YouTube user Mad Matt TV, shows a side-by-side speed test demonstration of the iPhone 6 Plus and the iPhone 6s Plus. The speed test demonstration includes many of the details you'd expect, such as proof of software type and device type, a boot-up test, application-launching tests, and more.
      The first thing anyone should expect with an iPhone 6 Plus in the mix is whether or not the 6 Plus is MLC or TLC. It makes a HUGE difference.

      The testing shows that the iPhone 6 Plus and iPhone 6s Plus take about the same amount of time boot up from a complete shut-down, but in terms of application launching speed, the iPhone 6s Plus' upgraded A9 CPU and 2GB of RAM are able to process and load applications much faster than the older iPhone 6 Plus with its A8 CPU and 1GB of RAM.
      The testing doesn't actually "show that" when it could just be the difference between TLC vs. MLC and BOTH are available on the iPhone 6 Plus. If you were buying either new you would get faster MLC, but an older 64GB iPhone 6 Plus like his could just as easily be slower TLC.

      The CPU has more to do with the application-launching speed than the RAM does, but when the CPU is done loading all that data, the RAM is where it gets stored temporarily until the user needs to access it again. The iPhone 6s Plus has an advantage because it has more space for this temporary data than the iPhone 6 Plus does, and this means it can more quickly launch multiple applications subsequently without having to re-load applications because the memory just doesn't fill up like the older iPhone 6 Plus' does. But in the way Mad Matt tests his in this video, this information is mostly irrelevant since he closes out of each application after launching it.
      LOL! Neither the CPU speed nor the RAM capacity are as important as the storage speed! It would be the primary bottleneck on either phone and we already know that some 64GB iPhone 6 Plus units had slower TLC flash storage while others had faster MLC storage. THAT is the crucially missing detail.

      The description of how RAM relates is way off too. It distractingly focuses on the "temporary" nature of RAM and makes it sound like it gets loaded from storage and into the CPU and then put in RAM temporarily until the CPU needs it. RAM isn't a page/swapfile. The RAM *IS* the CPU's workspace memory. Everything that it is currently doing/running is in RAM. It has an extremely small amount of higher speed cache memory internal to it so that the memory does not have to run at the same speed as the CPU, but that doesn't change the function of the system memory.

      The RAM is powered and holds its data as long as the CPU is powered, so there is nothing more "temporary" about it as the CPU's internal cache memory, registers, etc. RAM is workspace and not storage, which is why something must be saved to storage to persist when the device is powered off. You can leave data/instructions in RAM as long as the system is operating/powered.

      The speed advantage of having more RAM really only comes into play when there is not enough RAM and the OS has to remove data from RAM. It does this by closing/suspending/paging apps to storage in the background which, once again, is bottlenecked by storage performance.
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