1. boxxa's Avatar
    It's hard to argue the legality of it from the beginning. If the iPhone was stolen and gawker bought it to profit and promote their site I can see the issues but if some drunk newley out of college kid decides to leave it out it's perfectly fine IMO. Just a very fine line of freedom of the press and the part of profiting from stolen property.
    2010-07-17 04:46 AM
  2. LSZ33's Avatar
    Hopefully he gets his stuff back in the same way prior to them taking it. To all those on here saying they did the wrong thing, I'm sure you weren't complaining when you saw the gizmodo i4 release article were you?
    2010-07-17 05:24 AM
  3. QuinnNebula's Avatar
    this was still a problem I thought this got dealt with a while ago
    2010-07-17 05:32 AM
  4. tudtran's Avatar
    Lucky guy
    2010-07-17 06:30 AM
  5. thevmax's Avatar
    There is a fine line here.
    Any one of us could buy an IPhone 4 right now, take it apart, take pictures of it, and post it on ModMyI. Now the question is: Are we violating Apple's proprietary rights regarding the phone?

    The difference is: the IPhone 4 was not released yet when Gizmodo reported on it.
    But, is there a difference according to the law?
    And, was Gizmodo profiting from the issuance of his report?
    2010-07-17 06:39 AM
  6. h4ndcuffed's Avatar
    What about his actions were illegal? He purchased equipment that was found it was never stolen. It was news worldwide that it was LEFT at a bar. Not pick pocketed. Then he reviewed it and let us know what he saw. Simple as that apple took it as a great publicity stunt and then shot themselves in the foot anyway. Once apple was contacted he returned it. He's covered.
    2010-07-17 07:05 AM
  7. PAKIS-RULEZ's Avatar
    dam file a law suite if the warrant was illegal
    No signature links or spam... only warning
    2010-07-17 07:15 AM
  8. 718king's Avatar
    Lol, how does this suck? He's getting his stuff back.
    I can tell you've never had a search warrant executed on your house. Sometimes it's not what they take, it's what they toss and break while they're looking.
    2010-07-17 08:03 AM
  9. CZroe's Avatar
    There is a fine line here.
    Any one of us could buy an IPhone 4 right now, take it apart, take pictures of it, and post it on ModMyI. Now the question is: Are we violating Apple's proprietary rights regarding the phone?

    The difference is: the IPhone 4 was not released yet when Gizmodo reported on it.
    But, is there a difference according to the law?
    And, was Gizmodo profiting from the issuance of his report?
    You are barking up the wrong tree here. At issue was Apple's claims that the phone was stolen from Gray Powell. Otherwise, there was nothing illegal about purchasing access to it, taking it apart, and showing that to the world. If legally obtained, only contracts can stop that (non-disclosure agreements). Gizmodo signed and violated no contract. apple had no "proprietary rights." They have patent and trademark rights, but that has nothingto do with it. Secrets are them and theirs to keep. If they or one of their contracted confidants screws up, it's on them. The engineer may have lied to keep his job. The finder may have lied about what steps he took to return it to Apple. Gizmodo did not lie about how they obtained it and the pretenses they were under. Don't give Apple more "rights" than they have. Also, look up the definition of "rights." You are willingly giving them too much power. The police are not their personal gestapo.
    2010-07-17 08:51 AM
  10. iPhoneThereforeIAm's Avatar
    What about his actions were illegal? He purchased equipment that was found it was never stolen. It was news worldwide that it was LEFT at a bar. Not pick pocketed. Then he reviewed it and let us know what he saw. Simple as that apple took it as a great publicity stunt and then shot themselves in the foot anyway.
    Wrong!
    It's now clear that it was the very opposite of a publicity stunt - which explains Apple's extraordinarily heavy-handed response in Gizmodogate.

    Clearly the college kid testing the pre-release iPhone-4 left in a bar was making a very public statement about the phone's reception issues.
    The probability is that disgusted by the fact that iSteve was about to knowingly release a device with a fundamental design flaw, he went public.

    So Gizmodo was the unwitting, hapless victim of the tester's response to iSteve's arrogant folly.
    2010-07-17 11:57 AM
  11. son geta1's Avatar
    Hahaha.

    I hate Gizmodo, ModMyi for president!!
    2010-07-17 01:05 PM
  12. santacruzlocal's Avatar
    Good ol' California justice
    2010-07-17 06:55 PM
  13. bagek's Avatar
    this guy sold it for waaayyy more than $5000 FYI
    2010-07-18 12:04 AM
  14. Funked's Avatar
    I'm glad he's getting his stuff back, he done nothing wrong in my eyes.
    2010-07-18 04:06 AM
  15. mortopher's Avatar
    I can tell you've never had a search warrant executed on your house. Sometimes it's not what they take, it's what they toss and break while they're looking.
    Oh my, I almost choked from laughing while eating. Funniest post of the night!
    2010-07-18 11:20 AM
  16. politicalslug's Avatar
    Gizmodo knowingly purchased stolen property. That's a felony. Chen needs to get prosecuted. He's a blogger, not a journalist, and even if that weren't the case, it's illegal to purchase stolen property. Apple should set an example by suing Gawker Media (Gizmodo's parent company) into banruptcy. They have a very strong case.
    Last edited by politicalslug; 2010-07-19 at 07:59 AM. Reason: misspelling
    2010-07-19 07:56 AM
  17. mortopher's Avatar
    Apple seems to have enough on their plate lately. I don't see much more coming of this.
    2010-07-19 07:59 AM
  18. iPhoneThereforeIAm's Avatar
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 718king
    I can tell you've never had a search warrant executed on your house. Sometimes it's not what they take, it's what they toss and break while they're looking.
    Oh my, I almost choked from laughing while eating. Funniest post of the night!
    Why ?
    Last edited by iPhoneThereforeIAm; 2010-07-19 at 09:23 AM.
    2010-07-19 09:21 AM
  19. ehren88888's Avatar
    Gizmodo knowingly purchased stolen property. That's a felony. Chen needs to get prosecuted. He's a blogger, not a journalist, and even if that weren't the case, it's illegal to purchase stolen property. Apple should set an example by suing Gawker Media (Gizmodo's parent company) into banruptcy. They have a very strong case.
    +11111111111

    what a P.O.S. person he is.
    2010-07-19 10:42 PM
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