1. freshfitz's Avatar
    Will a bluetooth gps work with the iphone
    2007-08-13 07:07 PM
  2. GreggSymington's Avatar
    It may pair, but no. Unless someone creates a gps map program.
    2007-08-13 07:18 PM
  3. rgates's Avatar
    umm... I developed a program some time ago in perl, which runs on a webserver (apache or such) and displays a gps location on google maps. the gps fix is provided to the app by a unix utility called gpsd. all one would need to do is install a webserver on the iphone, install my perl script (POSSIBLY requires getting a Google Maps API code (if the location on the iphone webserver stays the same, one API code will do... e.g. 127.0.0.1/cgi-bin/gmaps/ - Google provides them for free), compile and install gpsd for the iphone, run gpsd using the serial port of the gps receiver, point safari to the perl application in safari - and voila

    the program was developed fairly quickly by me, so it does not have live updating or tracking... but who says some developer won't add that... the source code can be found here... http://code.google.com/p/googlepsmap/

    The project is not being developed by me anymore, it just sits and sleeps, feel free to do anything with it but give credit
    2007-09-13 02:11 PM
  4. Kyle Matthews's Avatar
    Interesting idea...
    .


    ↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → B A [select] [start] Kyle Matthews
    2007-09-14 08:39 AM
  5. EmoRebellion's Avatar
    Is anyone willing to take over this project? Sounds like a good idea.
    2007-09-15 02:39 AM
  6. fightclub's Avatar
    i wrote some code at the end of this last semester in c and ruby that takes gps fixes and plots them on google maps using their api... would this be of help?
    2007-09-15 04:06 AM
  7. MSHax's Avatar
    That depends, I see noone asked what the plans were with the bluetooth GPS.
    Short answer, Yes. If I'm in my minivan I pair with my GPS and use it as a handsfree kit. So if you're asking can you use it for handsfree, then Yes.

    Actually, in another car I have the rearview mirror that has a monitor in it which also uses bluetooth for caller id, recent calls and handsfree. See you can even use your iPhone with your vehicle mounted video monitors

    If you're wondering about the actual GPS then read above
    2007-09-15 07:09 AM
  8. CVB's Avatar
    I tried this out last weekend. The tricky part is it seems like the iphone has some sort of protections in place to prevent receiving serial communications. Sending serial commands seems to work well though.

    I just tried it on the 30 pin connectors rx/tx lines... haven't messed with the bluetooth yet but I'd assume they would have the same type of scheme in place.
    2007-09-17 06:41 AM
  9. andrew's Avatar
    check the installer app.
    i'm sure there is a web server of some sort included in there...
    anyone verify?
    called proxy server/ tiny proxy/ tiny server or something..?
    2007-09-30 12:38 AM
  10. jacklambertz's Avatar
    I tried this out last weekend. The tricky part is it seems like the iphone has some sort of protections in place to prevent receiving serial communications. Sending serial commands seems to work well though.

    I just tried it on the 30 pin connectors rx/tx lines... haven't messed with the bluetooth yet but I'd assume they would have the same type of scheme in place.
    I don't what it's worth but I thought it might help:http://www.dailyack.com/2004/12/mobi...-mac-os-x.html
    2007-11-16 05:27 AM
  11. luigi6699's Avatar
    I tried this out last weekend. The tricky part is it seems like the iphone has some sort of protections in place to prevent receiving serial communications. Sending serial commands seems to work well though.

    I just tried it on the 30 pin connectors rx/tx lines... haven't messed with the bluetooth yet but I'd assume they would have the same type of scheme in place.
    Just found this:
    http://www.hackaday.com/2007/12/11/i...cess-tutorial/

    Seems that the protection on receiving is that the device has to rotate the ground through the pins in the correct order. After you've done that, the port is open for serial business as usual. There's even a another project that built a serial GPS this way - a microcontroller to do the ground-toggling, then access is handed to the GPS device.

    http://www.hackaday.com/2007/12/14/iphone-gps-module/

    The good news is, this means that we can use the serial port, maybe even making cool things like a USB port or an SD slot. The bad news is, it pretty much trashes the theory that bluetooth would have the same protection.

    My understanding is that the bluetooth stack lacks the serial protocols entirely. I think what would have to be done is the following:
    1) find out what bluetooth chipset is in the iPhone
    2) find another, fully bluetooth enabled phone with the same chipset
    3) copy the bluetooth stack from the enabled phone to the iPhone
    4) drink beer

    Sadly, I'm not hacker enough to do it. Well, I could probably manage step 4 on my own, and maybe even steps 1 and 2, but I don't have the equipment for step 3.
    2007-12-21 06:29 AM
  12. esegre's Avatar
    Just found this:
    http://www.hackaday.com/2007/12/11/i...cess-tutorial/

    Seems that the protection on receiving is that the device has to rotate the ground through the pins in the correct order. After you've done that, the port is open for serial business as usual. There's even a another project that built a serial GPS this way - a microcontroller to do the ground-toggling, then access is handed to the GPS device.

    http://www.hackaday.com/2007/12/14/iphone-gps-module/

    The good news is, this means that we can use the serial port, maybe even making cool things like a USB port or an SD slot. The bad news is, it pretty much trashes the theory that bluetooth would have the same protection.

    My understanding is that the bluetooth stack lacks the serial protocols entirely. I think what would have to be done is the following:
    1) find out what bluetooth chipset is in the iPhone
    2) find another, fully bluetooth enabled phone with the same chipset
    3) copy the bluetooth stack from the enabled phone to the iPhone
    4) drink beer

    Sadly, I'm not hacker enough to do it. Well, I could probably manage step 4 on my own, and maybe even steps 1 and 2, but I don't have the equipment for step 3.
    I just found this interesting info here

    http://www.engadgetmobile.com/2007/1...le-for-iphone/
    2008-01-29 03:03 AM
  13. smokeonit's Avatar
    BLUEmagic Bluetooth stack

    that's the stack the iphone uses!!!

    source: tlrobinson.net / blog » Blog Archive » Geolocation possibilities on the iPhone scroll to GPS... or search for "stack"

    "GPS
    A built in GPS receiver in the iPhone would be the ideal solution, but of course this is out of the question at least until iPhone “2.0″ (wink wink Apple).

    Bluetooth GPS support for the iPhone would be awesome as well. It would require the Bluetooth serial port profile, which I would be surprised if the iPhone already has. iPhone uses the BLUEmagic Bluetooth stack which is “modular”… it’s unlikely that Apple would pay for unnecessary modules or include them if they did. Maybe someone could port an existing open source Bluetooth stack to the iPhone (Bluez, perhaps? OS X probably isn’t similar enough to Linux for that to be easy). Worst case, we could use a laptop as the missing link (iPhone -> WiFi -> laptop <- serial/USB/bluetooth <- GPS) but that seems like a really poor solution. Maybe iPhone <- serial <- GPS?
    "
    2008-07-14 01:06 PM
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