1. Michael Essany's Avatar


    Alarming allegations have emerged from Asia overnight suggesting that Apple's iCloud storage and backup services in China have been hacked.

    While few details -- let alone confirmed facts -- are available as of this writing, CNBC is pointing to a group of hackers "trying to steal user credentials."

    News of the purported hack first surfaced from a Chinese web monitoring group. Disturbingly, the group asserts that the Chinese government may be behind the hack attack in question.

    Using what is called a "man-in-the-middle" (MITM) attack, the hackers interposed their own website between users and Apple's iCloud server, intercepting data and potentially gaining access to passwords, iMessages, photos and contacts, Greatfire.org wrote in its blog post.
    Official sources inside of China maintain that the government is opposed to hacking, but those in the know continue to point toward the Chinese government for answers and, potentially, culpability.

    Apple is yet to comment on the matter. MMi will provide further updates as more information becomes available.

    Source: CNBC
    2014-10-21 07:25 PM
  2. SpiderManAPV's Avatar
    Forgive me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't this, yet again, not be Apple's fault?

    ......beware......
    Just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!
    2014-10-21 07:47 PM
  3. Jahooba's Avatar
    Chinese hackers - I don't trust 'em. They're the reason I never jailbroke using Pangu. Pangu was trouble to begin with seeing how they stole the jailbreak that was only suppose to be for training purposes.

    And reemember: America is currently locked in a major cyber war with communist China. Best not to download or install anything from the Chinese.
    2014-10-21 07:54 PM
  4. TechAlex's Avatar
    Check this link out , and see the brutal cyber attacks against the USA by the Chinese:

    Brutal cyber attacks against the USA by the Chinese
    2014-10-21 08:18 PM
  5. PCYoda's Avatar
    Forgive me if I'm wrong, but if the Chinese government (or anyone else) was redirecting HTTPS traffic to another server, wouldn't the software provide a warning about the security certificate not matching the ultimate destination? In which case, wouldn't this be entirely on the user for entering their credentials after such a warning?
    2014-10-21 08:53 PM
  6. Kotin6006's Avatar
    Chinese hackers - I don't trust 'em. They're the reason I never jailbroke using Pangu. Pangu was trouble to begin with seeing how they stole the jailbreak that was only suppose to be for training purposes.

    And reemember: America is currently locked in a major cyber war with communist China. Best not to download or install anything from the Chinese.
    Remember this is also America you are speaking of. They are watching you closer than the Chinese government.
    2014-10-21 08:56 PM
  7. Christophxr's Avatar
    Forgive me if I'm wrong, but if the Chinese government (or anyone else) was redirecting HTTPS traffic to another server, wouldn't the software provide a warning about the security certificate not matching the ultimate destination? In which case, wouldn't this be entirely on the user for entering their credentials after such a warning?
    Most people don't know what security certificates are, let alone what that little S at the end of HTTPS means, and unless you already know exactly what you're looking for, it's not the easiest thing to find this information. One could argue that this is instead on the developers of browsers to state this information, when this comes up, in short, non-technical terms. It's not that hard to do. I'll do it right now.

    "What's this? Probably nothing but it could mean hackers are trying to get your username/password. Click here for more information."

    Easy.
    2014-10-21 10:36 PM
  8. SpiderManAPV's Avatar
    Most people don't know what security certificates are, let alone what that little S at the end of HTTPS means, and unless you already know exactly what you're looking for, it's not the easiest thing to find this information. One could argue that this is instead on the developers of browsers to state this information, when this comes up, in short, non-technical terms. It's not that hard to do. I'll do it right now.

    "What's this? Probably nothing but it could mean hackers are trying to get your username/password. Click here for more information."

    Easy.
    Doesn't chrome do that? I don't think the iOS app does, but I believe the actual desktop browser will warn you.

    ......beware......
    Just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man!
    2014-10-21 10:48 PM
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